• Solicitation for Proposals
  • Workshop
  • Program Overview

FY 2014 Solicitation for Proposals

Application Package

For additional information, please send an email to jarc@metro.net.


More detailed information regarding the FY 2014 Solicitation for Proposals and project selection process will be provided by Metro staff at two workshops that are scheduled as follows:

Date: February 4, 2014
Time: 9:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
Location: Metro Gateway Headquarters Building
One Gateway Plaza, Union Station Conference Room (3rd floor)

Date: February 5, 2014
Time: 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Location: Metro Gateway Headquarters Building
One Gateway Plaza, Gateway Conference Room (3rd floor)

Presentation

Potential applicants are encouraged to attend one of these workshops.

Please print the Workshop Slide Presentation and bring it with you to the workshop.

 

For workshop registration, please RSVP by sending an email to Jarc@metro.net, or by calling Ms. Linda Tam at 213.922.2407, no later than February 3, 2014. Please indicate your agency’s name, your title, and the date of the workshop that you are interested in attending. On the day of the workshop, please register at the front desk on the third floor to get access to the conference room.

We also ask that you indicate whether you need special accommodations for the workshop or need to download the proposal package and other relevant information from our website. Potential proposers are required to attend one of the workshops. We will consider additional workshops as needed and upon request, including possible workshops at locations facilitated by potential proposers.


The Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU) was enacted on August 10, 2005.

The provisions of this legislation authorized changes to the JARC Program that was established under the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA-21). These provisions also authorized the establishment of the New Freedom Program. The JARC Program is codified at Section 5316 of Title 49 of the U.S. Code and the New Freedom Program is codified at Section 5317 of Title 49 of the U.S. Code. The Federal Transit Administration (FTA) is the federal agency authorized to administer these two programs.

SAFETEA-LU provides funding authorization for the JARC and New Freedom programs and requires the apportionment of funds by formula. Funds are required to be further distributed by states and designated recipients to eligible subrecipients following a competitive project selection process.

Federal transit law, as amended by SAFETEA-LU, requires projects funded from the JARC Program and the New Freedom program to be derived from a locally developed Coordinated Public Transit–Human Services Transportation Plan (the “Coordinated Plan”) beginning with the 2007 federal fiscal year.

The following is a general overview of the JARC and New Freedom programs, including goals, performance measures, project funding eligibility, and eligible subrecipients of program funds. It also includes a brief overview of program information relevant to Los Angeles County, including the roles of the designated recipient, the Coordinated Plan, and funding availability. Additional information is included in FTA guidance for each program.

JARC Program Goals

 The goal of the JARC program is to improve access to transportation services to employment and employment related activities for welfare recipients and eligible low-income individuals and to transport residents of urbanized areas and non-urbanized areas to suburban employment opportunities. Toward this goal, the FTA provides financial assistance for transportation services planned, designed, and carried out to meet the transportation needs of eligible low-income individuals, and of reverse commuters regardless of income. The program requires coordination of federally-assisted programs and services in order to make the most efficient use of federal resources.

New Freedom Program Goals

 The New Freedom formula grant program aims to provide additional tools to overcome existing barriers facing Americans with disabilities seeking integration into the work force and full participation in society and reduce barriers to transportation services and expand the transportation mobility options available to people with disabilities beyond the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA).

The program requires coordination of federally-assisted programs and services in order to make the most efficient use of federal resources.

JARC Program Performance Measures

The FTA has established the following two measures for the JARC Program in the current reporting year: first, the actual or estimated annual number of jobs that can be accessed as a result of geographic or temporal coverage of JARC projects; and, second, the actual or estimated annual number of rides (as measured by one-way trips) provided as a result of JARC projects.

New Freedom Program Performance Measures

 The FTA has established the following three measures for the New Freedom Program in the current reporting year:

  • Increases or enhancements related to geographic coverage, service quality and/or service times that impact availability of transportation services for individuals with disabilities as a result of New Freedom projects.

  • Additions or changes to environmental infrastructure (e.g., transportation facilities, side walks, etc), technology, and vehicles that impact availability of transportation services as a result of New Freedom projects.

  • Actual or estimated number of rides (as measured by one-way trips) provided for individuals with disabilities as a result of New Freedom projects.

Project Eligibility for JARC Funds

Eligible projects are those that support the development and maintenance of transportation services designed to transport low-income individuals to and from jobs and activities related to their employment and to support reverse commute projects.

They may include, but are not limited to capital, planning, and operating assistance to support new or expanded transportation services. The funds may be used for such activities as service extensions, guaranteed rides home, shuttle services, and ridesharing activities.

For capital expenses, federal funds provide up to 80% of the cost of the project and up to 50% of the eligible operating expenses. Funds from federal programs other than those administered by the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT), such as from federal agencies providing human services, may be used for matching purposes. The incremental cost of equipment or facilities required by the Clean Air Act or ADA may be funded at 90%.

Non-cash share such as donations, volunteered services, or in-kind contributions are eligible to be counted toward the local match as long as the value of each is documented and supported, represents a cost which would otherwise be eligible under the program, and is included in the net project costs in the project budget. The use of non-cash share toward the local match requires the approval of the designated recipient of funding from the JARC and New Freedom programs, as well as from the FTA.

Project Eligibility for New Freedom Funds

New Freedom Program funds are available for capital and operating expenses that support new public transportation services and new public transportation alternatives beyond those required by the ADA. These services and alternatives shall be designed to assist individuals with disabilities with accessing transportation services, including transportation to and from jobs and employment support services.

For the purpose of the New Freedom Program, “new” service is any service or activity that was not operational on August 10, 2005 and did not have an identified funding source as of August 10, 2005.

Eligible projects and activities aiming to provide new public transportation services beyond ADA include, but are not limited to: i) enhancing paratransit beyond minimum ADA requirements, such as expansion of service beyond the required 3/4 mile  and expansion of current hours of operation beyond those provided on the fixed route services; ii) new feeder service to commuter rail, commuter bus, intercity rail, and intercity bus stations, for which complementary paratransit service is not required under the ADA; iii) Making accessibility improvements to transit and intermodal stations not designated as key stations; and, iv) travel training about available public and alternative transportation options.

Eligible projects and activities aiming to provide new public transportation alternatives beyond ADA include, but are not limited to: i) purchasing vehicles to support new accessible taxi, ride sharing, and/or vanpooling programs; ii) supporting the administration and expenses related to new voucher programs for transportation services offered by human service providers; iii) supporting new volunteer driver and aide programs; and, iv) supporting new mobility management and coordination programs.

New Freedom funding may be used to support up to 80% of the capital project costs and up to 50% of the project’s net operating expenses. The incremental cost of equipment or facilities required by the Clean Air Act or ADA may be funded at 90%. Funds from other, non-USDOT federal programs (e.g. human services) may be used for matching purposes.

Non-cash share such as donations, volunteered services, or in-kind contributions are eligible to be counted toward the local match as long as the value of each is documented and supported, represents a cost which would otherwise be eligible under the program, and is included in the net project costs in the project budget. The use of non-cash share toward the local match requires the approval of the designated recipient of funding from the JARC and New Freedom programs, as well as from the FTA.

Eligible Subrecipients of Program Funds

There are three categories of eligible subrecipients of funds from the JARC and New Freedom programs: i) private non-profit organizations; ii) state or local government authority; and, iii) operators of public transportation services, including private operators of public transportation services.   

The Designated Recipient of Program Funds

The chief executive officer of each State or an official designee must designate a public entity to be the recipient of funds from the JARC and/or New Freedom programs. In California, the Governor designates federal transportation formula funds recipients through the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans).

On May 25, 2006 the Board of Directors adopted a resolution approving the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro) as the Designated Recipient to receive and dispense formula funding from the JARC and New Freedom programs. Metro is the Designated Recipient of JARC and New Freedom apportionments for the areas in Los Angeles County that are within the urbanized areas of Los Angeles-Santa Ana-Long Beach (UZA 2) and Lancaster-Palmdale (UZA 123).

As the Designated Recipient, the role of Metro is to conduct a competitive selection process requesting proposals for projects and programs eligible for funding from the JARC and New Freedom programs. As part of this process, Metro prepares and submits grant applications to FTA requesting funding on behalf of subrecipients. Metro also ensures that established program requirements are met.

Accordingly, Metro is responsible for making certifications, managing all aspects of grant distribution and oversight for funding sub-recipients, and submitting reports to FTA as requested. 

The Coordinated Public Transit–Human Services Transportation Plan

The Coordinated Public Transit-Human Plan for Los Angeles County was formally adopted by the Metro Board of Directors in January 2008.  This plan, which complies with the requirements of SAFETA-LU and will be updated every three to four years, establishes the overall goals for providing transportation services to disadvantaged and disabled groups, including the target populations of the JARC and New Freedom programs.

It was developed in consultation with stakeholder groups, including management and staff of human and social service organizations and their clients, public transit agencies, and local and regional agencies.  The plan includes four elements:

  • An assessment of available transportation service providers, both private and public;
  • An assessment of the transportation needs of disadvantaged individuals who may be elderly, disabled, and/or low-income;
  • A listing of strategies to address assessed transportation needs and gaps in service; and,
  • A priority listing of projects to be implemented based on available resources and feasibility for implementing specific strategies identified.

The plan also identifies four goals/ funding categories: coordination infrastructure, building capacity, information portals, and coordination policies and is available at: http://media.metro.net/projects_studies/coordination_plan.htm

FTA guidance and other information for the JARC Program are available at:    

FTA guidance and other information for the New Freedom Program are available at:     

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