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Metro’s Green Construction Equipment Initiative

Background

The construction industry currently relies heavily on diesel engines to power their machines. These diesel-powered engines are a significant source of air pollutants such as particulate matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NOx).

Air Pollutants

PM is an irritant that results from the incomplete combustion of diesel fuel. It contributes to respiratory and cardiovascular illnesses that may adversely affect children, the elderly and those with pre-existing respiratory conditions. Exposure to PM is known to cause asthma, heart attacks, strokes, lung cancer, and premature death.

NOx contributes to the formation of ground level ozone, which is a respiratory irritant that poses a health hazard for both healthy adults and individuals with pre-existing respiratory conditions.

According to the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD), heavy duty diesel trucks and off-road construction equipment operating in Southern California are major sources of PM and NOx emissions and are also among the sources identified for the greatest emission reduction potential.

Green Construction

In an effort to help mitigate diesel emissions in the South Coast Air Basin, local agencies such as the Port of Long Beach, Port of Los Angeles and Los Angeles Airports have developed green construction policies and guidelines.

On August 4, 2011 Metro adopted the Green Construction Policy (GCP) and committed to using greener, less polluting construction equipment and vehicles; and implementing best practices to reduce harmful diesel emissions on all Metro construction projects performed on Metro properties and rights of way.


As an international leader in environmental and sustainability practices, Metro has created a Green Construction Policy (GCP) for its planning, construction, operations and procurement activities.

By adopting this policy, Metro is committed to using greener, less polluting construction equipment and vehicles, and will implement best practices to reduce harmful emissions in all construction projects performed on Metro properties and rights-of-way.

Metro’s GCP applies ONLY to Metro contractors and Metro construction projects.

Purpose

The GCP provides requirements for:

  1. Identifying and mitigating diesel exhaust emission impacts from on-road and off-road equipment used during Metro construction and development activities, on human health and the environment.
  2. Implementing appropriate Best Management Practices to complement equipment mitigations.
  3. Implementing strategies to ensure compliance with this policy.

The ultimate goal is to reduce harmful air emissions (particularly particulate matter and nitrogen oxides) while minimizing any significant impact to cost and schedule in any existing construction project.

Metro Contractors

For all Metro construction projects or construction projects on Metro rights-of-way, Metro requires contractors to implement the provisions of the GCP to the greatest extent possible.

Metro incorporated the GCP requirements into contract specifications that may be included in your project contract documents. A copy of Metro’s GCP Contract Specifications and Submittals is located to the right under “Policy & Specifications”.

For more information about Metro’s GCP requirements, please refer to the resources to the right.


Metro’s Green Construction Policy (GCP) does not apply to City or Special Jurisdiction contractors or construction projects funded by Metro.

Contractors with construction equipment operating in Los Angeles County, however, are subject to regulations implemented and enforced by the California Air Resources Board (ARB), South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) and Antelope Valley Air Quality Management District (AVAQMD).

California Air Resources Board

ARB is the department within Cal EPA that promotes and protects public health, welfare, and ecological resources through the reduction of air pollutants while taking the economy of the state into consideration. ARB is responsible for implementing and enforcing programs to reduce particulate matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions from diesel-fueled mobile sources.

South Coast Air Quality Management District

SCAQMD is responsible for implementing and enforcing Federal and State air pollution regulations and controlling emissions from stationary sources of air pollution for LA, Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties.

Antelope Valley Air Quality Management District

AVAQMD is charged with regulating stationary sources of air pollution in the northern portion of LA County. AVAQMD has adopted similar rules and regulations to that of the SCAQMD.

For more information about ARB, SCAQMD and AVAQMD rules and regulations pertaining to on-road vehicles, off-road construction equipment and portable equipment used on construction projects in LA County, please refer to the resources to the right.


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