Skip to Content
Search

Gateway Cities Technology Plan for Goods Movement

Technology Helping Goods Move Efficiently

TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS support greater safety and efficiency in moving people and goods on our highways, railroads, waterways and ports. Some useful applications include real-time traveler information-sharing and use of advanced communications for vehicles and transportation infrastructure. The Gateway Cities Technology Plan for Goods Movement will provide a blueprint for an end-to-end information support system that can improve the efficiency of goods movement in Southern California through the integration of traditional real-time road and traveler information technologies, along with intermodal freight, port and truck technologies.  This Plan is  being developed by the Gateway Cities Council of Governments and the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority with input from the Ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles, Caltrans and many other key stakeholders.

THE GATEWAY CITIES TECHNOLOGY PLAN FOR GOODS MOVEMENT WILL INCLUDE:

  • Detailed research on the latest applicable trends practices and regional priorities in technology applications for goods movement and other transportation needs;
  • Feasibility studies of several project areas for new and expanded technology applications for Gateway Cities identified by the 2008 ITS Integration Plan for Goods Movement (the earlier phase of this project);
  • Exploration of technologies supporting emerging alternatives for 1-710 corridor improvements; and
  • Detailed concept of operations and a business plan to ensure that real-world projects for implementation are the outcome of the Plan.

The 2008 ITS Integration Plan identified the intelligent transportation system (ITS) needs of the Gateway Cities and Southern California as well as several projects to improve goods movement. This ground-breaking project represented a significant fusion of ITS and freight operations technologies. This was achieved through a dedicated public and private sectors (ITS Working Group) that developed sustainable solutions. The Plan was initiated by Gateway Cities Council of Governments (GCCOG) in partnership with Caltrans and the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA).


  1. What is the Gateway Cities Technology Plan for Goods Movement?
  2. How does this effort relate to the 2008 ITS Integration Plan?
  3. Why is the Gateway Cities Technology Plan for Goods Movement Project important at this time?
  4. What is the project schedule?
  5. Who is developing the Gateway Cities Technology Plan for Goods Movement Project?
  6. What outcomes will the new Gateway Cities Technology Plan for Goods Movement produce?
  7. How can regional stakeholders participate in this process?
  8. What are the expectations for participants in the ITS Working Group?

1. What is the Gateway Cities Technology Plan for Goods Movement?

The Gateway Cities Technology Plan for Goods Movement is a program initiated by the Gateway Cities Council of Governments (GCCOG) in partnership with Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA).  This program will result in the creation of a blueprint for an end-to end information support system that can improve the efficiency of goods movement in Southern California through the integration of traditional real-time road and traveler information technologies along with unique intermodal freight, port and truck transportation and information technologies.

Back to top

2. How does this effort relate to the 2008 ITS Integration Plan?

The Gateway Cities Technology Plan for Goods Movement builds on the work completed in the 2008 ITS Integration Plan study. The 2008 ITS Integration Plan identified the intelligent transportation system (ITS) needs within Gateway Cities and Southern California for goods movement. This ground-breaking project represented a significant fusion of ITS and freight operations technologies.

Back to top

3. Why is the Gateway Cities Technology Plan for Goods Movement Project important at this time?

With the growth in Southern California goods movement comes a number of significant traffic, safety and air quality issues.  The projects identified in this study will lead to reducing goods movement related congestion, truck emissions, improving safety and contribute to additional roadway capacity for supporting continued economic growth.  Most importantly, completion of the study and implementation of the projects can result in some immediate traffic, safety and air quality benefits.

Back to top

4. What is the project schedule?

Preliminary project outreach and research began in August. This project is anticipated to be completed in December 2012.

Back to top

5. Who is developing the Gateway Cities Technology Plan for Goods Movement Project?

The Gateway Cities Technology Plan is being developed by the Gateway Cities Council of Governments and the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) with input from FHWA, the Ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles, Caltrans, and many other key stakeholders.

Back to top

6. What outcomes will the new Gateway Cities Technology Plan for Goods Movement produce?

The Gateway Cities Technology Plan will provide the following outcomes:

  • Detailed research on the latest trends, practices and regional priorities on ITS goods movement and other transportation technologies;
  • Feasibility studies of over ten different opportunity areas for new and expanded ITS technologies for Gateway Cities;
  • Exploration of technologies supporting emerging alternatives for I-710 corridor improvements; and
  • A detailed concept of operations, project implementation schedule, and a business plan to ensure development of real-world, working solutions.

Back to top

7. How can regional stakeholders participate in this process?

An ITS Working Group, comprised of transportation and freight industry stakeholders from the public and private sectors in the Gateway Cities Region was formed for the 2008 ITS Integration Plan.  Public-sector participants included Federal, state, and local governments; the regional metropolitan planning organization and regional transportation planning authority, regional ports, commissions and coalitions.  The private-sector group included a variety of terminal operators, drayage operators, Class I and short line rail lines and other private transportation and goods movement organizations and associations.  This group will be reconvened to guide the development of the Gateway Cities Technology Plan.

Back to top

8. What are the expectations for participants in the ITS Working Group?

Guidance of the ITS Working Group participants will be used from four meetings of approximately 2-3 hours duration where the project direction, preliminary findings, and recommendations will be reviewed. The ITS Working Group will be given the opportunity to review key deliverables and, individually, provide input unique to their needs  to help shape the final Concept of Operations and Business Plan.

Back to top


Share this page on
Advertisement
Close Search Window

Search metro.net, The Source, and El Pasajero