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Regional Connector

REGIONAL CONNECTOR

The Metro Regional Connector Project connects the Metro Gold Line to 7th Street/Metro Center Station in downtown Los Angeles, allowing passengers to transfer to the Blue, Expo, Red and Purple Lines, bypassing Union Station.

The Metro Regional Connector Project Art Program encompasses a range of temporary and permanent projects. Seven artists have been commissioned to create site-specific, integrated artworks for the three new stations.

Little Tokyo/Arts District Station

Clare Rojas

“The landscape is the great equalizer of humanity. Our cultural traditions are deeply shaped by the earth’s [daily] rotation around the sun, lunar tides, sunrise and sunset.”

Clare Rojas’s artwork will honor the presence of the natural world within the urban landscape and highlight humanity’s shared rhythm with the land, water and sky. The sun rises and sets from east to west in her lyrical composition of gradated colors and abstracted shapes for the glass walls of the station’s entrance pavilion. Below lunar diagrams, curvilinear columns simulate waves that intermittently reveal and obscure geometric, buildinglike forms. The translucent surface will refract daylight in a full spectrum of color on the surrounding pavement. The artwork draws inspiration in part from Metro’s expansive rail lines emanating from the station. The artist likens the interconnecting routes to arteries that, like LA’s historic aqueduct system and natural tributaries, lead to the ocean. Rojas will engage the community through an intergenerational crochet workshop, during which she will share her artwork and invite participants to share stories at the intersection of natural systems and cultural rituals.

Audrey Chan

“Perseverance, collective struggle and storytelling are vital elements of a thriving community. The artwork will create a space to dream, to form mythologies from our experiences and layered cultural histories, desires.””

Inspired by Little Tokyo, the Arts District and neighboring communities, Audrey Chan’s station artwork will celebrate Los Angeles’s vibrant and complex history. Chan’s allegorical dreamscape will feature important community figures (such as entrepreneur Biddy Mason and photographer Toyo Miyatake) and local monuments and events (including the Little Tokyo Watchtower, Aoyama tree and Nisei Week Festival). These cultural identifiers will be juxtaposed with depictions of the region’s indigenous peoples, fauna and flora. The images will be featured on art panels flanking the station platform. Chan’s project evolved from area walks, conversations with local residents and archival research. In August 2017, she hosted a workshop during the Japanese American Cultural & Community Center’s Nisei Week celebration that sparked community conversation, formed new connections and illuminated the artwork’s symbolism and historical references.

Historic Broadway Station

Andrea Bowers

“The landscape is the great equalizer of humanity. Our cultural traditions are deeply shaped by the earth’s [daily] rotation around the sun, lunar tides, sunrise and sunset.”

Clare Rojas’s artwork will honor the presence of the natural world within the urban landscape and highlight humanity’s shared rhythm with the land, water and sky. The sun rises and sets from east to west in her lyrical composition of gradated colors and abstracted shapes for the glass walls of the station’s entrance pavilion. Below lunar diagrams, curvilinear columns simulate waves that intermittently reveal and obscure geometric, buildinglike forms. The translucent surface will refract daylight in a full spectrum of color on the surrounding pavement. The artwork draws inspiration in part from Metro’s expansive rail lines emanating from the station. The artist likens the interconnecting routes to arteries that, like LA’s historic aqueduct system and natural tributaries, lead to the ocean. Rojas will engage the community through an intergenerational crochet workshop, during which she will share her artwork and invite participants to share stories at the intersection of natural systems and cultural rituals.

Mark Steven Greenfield

“Perseverance, collective struggle and storytelling are vital elements of a thriving community. The artwork will create a space to dream, to form mythologies from our experiences and layered cultural histories, desires.””

Inspired by Little Tokyo, the Arts District and neighboring communities, Audrey Chan’s station artwork will celebrate Los Angeles’s vibrant and complex history. Chan’s allegorical dreamscape will feature important community figures (such as entrepreneur Biddy Mason and photographer Toyo Miyatake) and local monuments and events (including the Little Tokyo Watchtower, Aoyama tree and Nisei Week Festival). These cultural identifiers will be juxtaposed with depictions of the region’s indigenous peoples, fauna and flora. The images will be featured on art panels flanking the station platform. Chan’s project evolved from area walks, conversations with local residents and archival research. In August 2017, she hosted a workshop during the Japanese American Cultural & Community Center’s Nisei Week celebration that sparked community conversation, formed new connections and illuminated the artwork’s symbolism and historical references.

Clarence Williams

“Perseverance, collective struggle and storytelling are vital elements of a thriving community. The artwork will create a space to dream, to form mythologies from our experiences and layered cultural histories, desires.””

Inspired by Little Tokyo, the Arts District and neighboring communities, Audrey Chan’s station artwork will celebrate Los Angeles’s vibrant and complex history. Chan’s allegorical dreamscape will feature important community figures (such as entrepreneur Biddy Mason and photographer Toyo Miyatake) and local monuments and events (including the Little Tokyo Watchtower, Aoyama tree and Nisei Week Festival). These cultural identifiers will be juxtaposed with depictions of the region’s indigenous peoples, fauna and flora. The images will be featured on art panels flanking the station platform. Chan’s project evolved from area walks, conversations with local residents and archival research. In August 2017, she hosted a workshop during the Japanese American Cultural & Community Center’s Nisei Week celebration that sparked community conversation, formed new connections and illuminated the artwork’s symbolism and historical references.

Grand Av Arts/Bunker Hill Station

Pearl C. Hsiung

“Perseverance, collective struggle and storytelling are vital elements of a thriving community. The artwork will create a space to dream, to form mythologies from our experiences and layered cultural histories, desires.””

Inspired by Little Tokyo, the Arts District and neighboring communities, Audrey Chan’s station artwork will celebrate Los Angeles’s vibrant and complex history. Chan’s allegorical dreamscape will feature important community figures (such as entrepreneur Biddy Mason and photographer Toyo Miyatake) and local monuments and events (including the Little Tokyo Watchtower, Aoyama tree and Nisei Week Festival). These cultural identifiers will be juxtaposed with depictions of the region’s indigenous peoples, fauna and flora. The images will be featured on art panels flanking the station platform. Chan’s project evolved from area walks, conversations with local residents and archival research. In August 2017, she hosted a workshop during the Japanese American Cultural & Community Center’s Nisei Week celebration that sparked community conversation, formed new connections and illuminated the artwork’s symbolism and historical references.

Mungo Thomson

“Perseverance, collective struggle and storytelling are vital elements of a thriving community. The artwork will create a space to dream, to form mythologies from our experiences and layered cultural histories, desires.””

Inspired by Little Tokyo, the Arts District and neighboring communities, Audrey Chan’s station artwork will celebrate Los Angeles’s vibrant and complex history. Chan’s allegorical dreamscape will feature important community figures (such as entrepreneur Biddy Mason and photographer Toyo Miyatake) and local monuments and events (including the Little Tokyo Watchtower, Aoyama tree and Nisei Week Festival). These cultural identifiers will be juxtaposed with depictions of the region’s indigenous peoples, fauna and flora. The images will be featured on art panels flanking the station platform. Chan’s project evolved from area walks, conversations with local residents and archival research. In August 2017, she hosted a workshop during the Japanese American Cultural & Community Center’s Nisei Week celebration that sparked community conversation, formed new connections and illuminated the artwork’s symbolism and historical references.

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

These artists are also engaging downtown communities by hosting public events and focused workshops intended to inform the artists’ design processes and/or build awareness about their Regional Connector artworks. In addition, the Art Program will include rotating exhibitions within the future stations and temporary murals for the construction site fences at Historic Broadway Station and Grand Av Arts/Bunker Hill Station.

BELOW WILL BE A SLIDESHOW w/captions describing the community engagement activities and images of the construction fences.

CAPTION TEXT FOR EACH IMAGE
Regional Connector artists are engaging downtown communities through a range of activities, such as art-making workshops, artist talks, events at local schools and public performances that connect to the artwork. These activities are intended to inform the artists’ design processes and/or build public awareness of the future artworks at Regional Connector stations.

For more information about the Regional Connector Project Art Program, contact Letitia F. Ivins at ivinsl@metro.net
For more information about the Regional Connector Transit Project, please see www.metro.net/projects/connector/

INSTAGRAM FEED or SLIDESHOW of Works-in-Progress photos

Art Advisory Group

Station artists were selected through a competitive, community-based process by local arts professionals known for their connection to the Regional Connector corridor, coupled with their expertise in contemporary visual art and demonstrated experience as panelists. An art advisory group, including the art panel and stakeholder representatives with a strong connection to the arts, has been convened to serve as a key community touchstone during artwork development.

Charles Gaines
Artist (panelist)

Nick Griffin
Vice President of Economic Development
Downtown Center Business Improvement District

Leslie Ito
President and CEO
Japanese American Cultural & Community Center (panelist)

Gabrielle Newmark
Founder
Swamp Pink Landscape Architecture
Program Director
Industrial District Green

Ming Ng
Vice President, Community Engagement
Music Center

Escott Norton
Executive Director
Los Angeles Historic Theatre Foundation

Erica Overskei
Program Manager
Arts Brookfield

Renee Petropoulos
Artist
(panelist)

Cheyanne Sauter
Executive Director
Art Share L.A.

Ed Schad
Associate Curator and Publications Manager
The Broad

Morgan Jaybush Sykes
Project Manager
Omgiving

Lanka Tattersall
Assistant Curator
Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (panelist)

Daisy Villa
Artist

Qris Yamashita
Graphic Designer

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